YAM: SummerFair

SummerFair, now in its 43rd year, is the largest arts and crafts festival in the region, featuring artisans from across the country. More than 100 artists, community groups, and food vendors participate every year. Artist booths at SummerFair include painting, pottery, art from nature, glass, wood, metal, fiber art, photography, body products, and artisan foods. SummerFair is a great place to find that unique gift for yourself or someone special while supporting the Billings Community.

While SummerFair is a fundraiser for the Museum, it truly meets the YAM’s mission by enriching the community through interactive experiences and creative exchange while collaborating with our community partners, like our friends at MSU-Billings!

After a challenging year for all, the YAM is looking forward to bringing this popular event back to the community in 2021. However, please be assured that we will be hosting SummerFair in compliance with recommended CDC safety guidelines as they develop. We can’t predict the future, but we plan to stay agile and adhere to outdoor gathering regulations that keep our staff, vendors, and community safe.

  • Posted on: June 27, 2021

YAM: SummerFair

SummerFair, now in its 43rd year, is the largest arts and crafts festival in the region, featuring artisans from across the country. More than 100 artists, community groups, and food vendors participate every year. Artist booths at SummerFair include painting, pottery, art from nature, glass, wood, metal, fiber art, photography, body products, and artisan foods. SummerFair is a great place to find that unique gift for yourself or someone special while supporting the Billings Community.

While SummerFair is a fundraiser for the Museum, it truly meets the YAM’s mission by enriching the community through interactive experiences and creative exchange while collaborating with our community partners, like our friends at MSU-Billings!

After a challenging year for all, the YAM is looking forward to bringing this popular event back to the community in 2021. However, please be assured that we will be hosting SummerFair in compliance with recommended CDC safety guidelines as they develop. We can’t predict the future, but we plan to stay agile and adhere to outdoor gathering regulations that keep our staff, vendors, and community safe.

  • Posted on: June 26, 2021

YAM: SummerFair

SummerFair, now in its 43rd year, is the largest arts and crafts festival in the region, featuring artisans from across the country. More than 100 artists, community groups, and food vendors participate every year. Artist booths at SummerFair include painting, pottery, art from nature, glass, wood, metal, fiber art, photography, body products, and artisan foods. SummerFair is a great place to find that unique gift for yourself or someone special while supporting the Billings Community.

While SummerFair is a fundraiser for the Museum, it truly meets the YAM’s mission by enriching the community through interactive experiences and creative exchange while collaborating with our community partners, like our friends at MSU-Billings!

After a challenging year for all, the YAM is looking forward to bringing this popular event back to the community in 2021. However, please be assured that we will be hosting SummerFair in compliance with recommended CDC safety guidelines as they develop. We can’t predict the future, but we plan to stay agile and adhere to outdoor gathering regulations that keep our staff, vendors, and community safe.

  • Posted on: June 25, 2021

Billings Symphony: Schubert’s Unfinished

*Postponed from October 24th and 25th*

The BSOC’s season continues with Schubert’s hauntingly romantic “Unfinished” Symphony and Grammy-nominated cellist Amit Peled performing Saint-Saëns’ charmingly effervescent concerto.

In addition to our live concerts at Lockwood Performing Arts Center, the BSOC will offer a live stream option on Saturday night so that all who wish to can attend.

Please note that masks are required at all times when in our venues.  Thank you for helping us to safely present live music in Billings!

Under 30/Student tickets are available by calling 460-252-3610.

AMIT PELED

Israeli-American cellist, conductor, and pedagogue Amit Peled, a musician of profound artistry and charismatic stage presence, is acclaimed worldwide as one of the most exciting and virtuosic instrumentalists on the concert stage today. At 6′5″, Peled started life as a basketball player and was called “larger than life” and “Jacqueline du Pré in a farmer’s body” when he enveloped his cello. Peled strives to break down the barriers of the concert hall, about which The Baltimore Sun wrote, “His amiable and inviting personality is exactly the type everyone says we’ll need more of if classical music is to survive.” From 2012 through 2018, Peled performed on the Pablo Casals 1733 Goffriller cello, which was loaned to him personally by Casals’ widow, Marta Casals Istomin. He was also named Music Director for CityMusic Cleveland for the 2019-2020 season.

 

 

CAMILLE SAINT-SAËNS | CELLO CONCERTO NO. 1

Program Notes

In February 1871, as Paris began to recover from the Franco-Prussian war, the new Société Nationale de Musique—of which Saint-Saëns was a founder—promoted its first concert under the banner ‘Ars gallica,’ and the impetus was thereby given to young French composers to outdo the Germans in every way possible. It was partly pressure from the Société that pushed the staid Concerts du Conservatoire into accepting the premiere of Saint-Saëns’s first cello concerto in January 1873, but more the request from the established cellist Auguste Tolbecque, without which, the conductor kindly informed the composer, the work would not have had a hope.

Saint-Saëns broke with convention in writing the concerto. Instead of the normal three-movement concerto form, the score is compact in structure and plays in one continuous movement with three distinct sections. Tunes abound in an orderly way: the main themes of the outer sections move upwards, the second themes downwards. (That is, if the opening cello motif can be called a ‘theme’—the composer’s biographer Brian Rees refers to it as ‘an artefact rather than a melodious outburst.’) The turbulent opening section leads into a delightful minuet, which no doubt reassured Parisian audiences in those troubled times that French culture had survived after all. The return of earlier material in the third movement shows the influence of the cyclic patterns found in the music of Franz Liszt.

This sunny and colorful concerto has always been one of Saint-Saëns’ most popular pieces, and many composers, including Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff, considered it to be the greatest of all cello concertos. Musicologist and conductor Donald Tovey summed up this concerto—chosen by Pablo Casals for his 1905 London debut—with the remark that it is “pure and brilliant without putting on chastity as a garment, and without calling attention to its jewelry at a banquet of poor relations.”

Saint-Saëns’ concerto has appeared seven times on Billings Symphony programs, Soloists have included three MASO Young Artists and world-renown Hungarian-American cellist, János Starker (1924-2013).

 

FRANZ SCHUBERT | “UNFINISHED” SYMPHONY

Program Notes

If anyone can be said to have lived to write music, it was Franz Schubert. While he often complained about the difficulty of composition, he could also write with exceptional speed and fluidity, often finishing one work and immediately beginning another. The compositional output of his far-too-short career is staggering: nearly 1000 works, including 9 symphonies, 6 masses, 21 piano sonatas, 15 string quartets, 7 singspiels, 9 operas, a melodrama, the incidental music for Rosamunde, overtures, chamber music, and more than 600 song settings.

Of all his works, a romantic mystique has long surrounded the story of his “Unfinished” Symphony. Schubert composed his Symphony No. 8 (or No. 7, by some accounts) in B-minor in 1822, fully orchestrating the first two movements and some 20 bars of a scherzo. (A full piano sketch of the scherzo exists, but he never completed the orchestration.) The following year, Schubert received an honorary diploma from the Styrian Music Society in Graz. In his acceptance letter, he mentioned a newly composed symphony, and dispatched the manuscript of the B-minor Symphony to his friend, the composer Anselm Hüttenbrenner, after first ripping out the pages with the incomplete scherzo. For reasons unknown, Hüttenbrenner never forwarded the manuscript to the music society, and it lay in a drawer in his study for the next 42 years. A chance remark disclosed the existence of the symphony to the conductor Johann von Herbeck, who persuaded Hüttenbrenner to let him borrow the score, and in December of 1865—some 37 years after the composer’s death—the B-minor Symphony premiered to great critical acclaim.

The “Unfinished” Symphony is not Schubert’s only unfinished work; indeed, not even his only unfinished symphony, but it is the only one in which the extant movements are fully scored. There has been intense speculation about why Schubert never finished the work: illness (late in 1822 he contracted syphilis, which was eventually to take his life); overwork (at the time he was also working on two operas, the incidental music to the play Rosamunde, and the Wanderer fantasy); a reluctance to invite comparison to Beethoven; a fear that he could not sustain the remarkable character of the first two movements. There may be a grain of truth in this last explanation, for the “Unfinished” was certainly unlike any of his previous symphonies. But the most likely explanation is perhaps the simplest: the 25-year-old composer simply lost interest in the work and moved on.

Schubert’s “Unfinished” Symphony appeared on the Billings Symphony’s premier concert in May 1951, under the baton of founding conductor Robert Staffanson. His successor George Perkins was particularly fond of the work, programming in its, er, entirety for the Alberta Bair stage in November 1956, April 1973 and October 1982, and individual movements for Symphony in the Park in 1958, 1974 and 1976. The BSO’s last performance of the “Unfinished,” was in April 1990, under the baton of Uri Barnea.

 

*Programming subject to change

  • Posted on: June 20, 2021

Billings Symphony: Schubert’s Unfinished

*Postponed from October 24th and 25th*

The BSOC’s season continues with Schubert’s hauntingly romantic “Unfinished” Symphony and Grammy-nominated cellist Amit Peled performing Saint-Saëns’ charmingly effervescent concerto.

In addition to our live concerts at Lockwood Performing Arts Center, the BSOC will offer a live stream option on Saturday night so that all who wish to can attend.

Please note that masks are required at all times when in our venues.  Thank you for helping us to safely present live music in Billings!

Under 30/Student tickets are available by calling 460-252-3610.

AMIT PELED

Israeli-American cellist, conductor, and pedagogue Amit Peled, a musician of profound artistry and charismatic stage presence, is acclaimed worldwide as one of the most exciting and virtuosic instrumentalists on the concert stage today. At 6′5″, Peled started life as a basketball player and was called “larger than life” and “Jacqueline du Pré in a farmer’s body” when he enveloped his cello. Peled strives to break down the barriers of the concert hall, about which The Baltimore Sun wrote, “His amiable and inviting personality is exactly the type everyone says we’ll need more of if classical music is to survive.” From 2012 through 2018, Peled performed on the Pablo Casals 1733 Goffriller cello, which was loaned to him personally by Casals’ widow, Marta Casals Istomin. He was also named Music Director for CityMusic Cleveland for the 2019-2020 season.

 

 

CAMILLE SAINT-SAËNS | CELLO CONCERTO NO. 1

Program Notes

In February 1871, as Paris began to recover from the Franco-Prussian war, the new Société Nationale de Musique—of which Saint-Saëns was a founder—promoted its first concert under the banner ‘Ars gallica,’ and the impetus was thereby given to young French composers to outdo the Germans in every way possible. It was partly pressure from the Société that pushed the staid Concerts du Conservatoire into accepting the premiere of Saint-Saëns’s first cello concerto in January 1873, but more the request from the established cellist Auguste Tolbecque, without which, the conductor kindly informed the composer, the work would not have had a hope.

Saint-Saëns broke with convention in writing the concerto. Instead of the normal three-movement concerto form, the score is compact in structure and plays in one continuous movement with three distinct sections. Tunes abound in an orderly way: the main themes of the outer sections move upwards, the second themes downwards. (That is, if the opening cello motif can be called a ‘theme’—the composer’s biographer Brian Rees refers to it as ‘an artefact rather than a melodious outburst.’) The turbulent opening section leads into a delightful minuet, which no doubt reassured Parisian audiences in those troubled times that French culture had survived after all. The return of earlier material in the third movement shows the influence of the cyclic patterns found in the music of Franz Liszt.

This sunny and colorful concerto has always been one of Saint-Saëns’ most popular pieces, and many composers, including Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff, considered it to be the greatest of all cello concertos. Musicologist and conductor Donald Tovey summed up this concerto—chosen by Pablo Casals for his 1905 London debut—with the remark that it is “pure and brilliant without putting on chastity as a garment, and without calling attention to its jewelry at a banquet of poor relations.”

Saint-Saëns’ concerto has appeared seven times on Billings Symphony programs, Soloists have included three MASO Young Artists and world-renown Hungarian-American cellist, János Starker (1924-2013).

 

FRANZ SCHUBERT | “UNFINISHED” SYMPHONY

Program Notes

If anyone can be said to have lived to write music, it was Franz Schubert. While he often complained about the difficulty of composition, he could also write with exceptional speed and fluidity, often finishing one work and immediately beginning another. The compositional output of his far-too-short career is staggering: nearly 1000 works, including 9 symphonies, 6 masses, 21 piano sonatas, 15 string quartets, 7 singspiels, 9 operas, a melodrama, the incidental music for Rosamunde, overtures, chamber music, and more than 600 song settings.

Of all his works, a romantic mystique has long surrounded the story of his “Unfinished” Symphony. Schubert composed his Symphony No. 8 (or No. 7, by some accounts) in B-minor in 1822, fully orchestrating the first two movements and some 20 bars of a scherzo. (A full piano sketch of the scherzo exists, but he never completed the orchestration.) The following year, Schubert received an honorary diploma from the Styrian Music Society in Graz. In his acceptance letter, he mentioned a newly composed symphony, and dispatched the manuscript of the B-minor Symphony to his friend, the composer Anselm Hüttenbrenner, after first ripping out the pages with the incomplete scherzo. For reasons unknown, Hüttenbrenner never forwarded the manuscript to the music society, and it lay in a drawer in his study for the next 42 years. A chance remark disclosed the existence of the symphony to the conductor Johann von Herbeck, who persuaded Hüttenbrenner to let him borrow the score, and in December of 1865—some 37 years after the composer’s death—the B-minor Symphony premiered to great critical acclaim.

The “Unfinished” Symphony is not Schubert’s only unfinished work; indeed, not even his only unfinished symphony, but it is the only one in which the extant movements are fully scored. There has been intense speculation about why Schubert never finished the work: illness (late in 1822 he contracted syphilis, which was eventually to take his life); overwork (at the time he was also working on two operas, the incidental music to the play Rosamunde, and the Wanderer fantasy); a reluctance to invite comparison to Beethoven; a fear that he could not sustain the remarkable character of the first two movements. There may be a grain of truth in this last explanation, for the “Unfinished” was certainly unlike any of his previous symphonies. But the most likely explanation is perhaps the simplest: the 25-year-old composer simply lost interest in the work and moved on.

Schubert’s “Unfinished” Symphony appeared on the Billings Symphony’s premier concert in May 1951, under the baton of founding conductor Robert Staffanson. His successor George Perkins was particularly fond of the work, programming in its, er, entirety for the Alberta Bair stage in November 1956, April 1973 and October 1982, and individual movements for Symphony in the Park in 1958, 1974 and 1976. The BSO’s last performance of the “Unfinished,” was in April 1990, under the baton of Uri Barnea.

 

*Programming subject to change

  • Posted on: June 19, 2021

Billings Symphony: Schubert’s Unfinished

*Postponed from October 24th and 25th*

The BSOC’s season continues with Schubert’s hauntingly romantic “Unfinished” Symphony and Grammy-nominated cellist Amit Peled performing Saint-Saëns’ charmingly effervescent concerto.

In addition to our live concerts at Lockwood Performing Arts Center, the BSOC will offer a live stream option on Saturday night so that all who wish to can attend.

Please note that masks are required at all times when in our venues.  Thank you for helping us to safely present live music in Billings!

Under 30/Student tickets are available by calling 460-252-3610.

AMIT PELED

Israeli-American cellist, conductor, and pedagogue Amit Peled, a musician of profound artistry and charismatic stage presence, is acclaimed worldwide as one of the most exciting and virtuosic instrumentalists on the concert stage today. At 6′5″, Peled started life as a basketball player and was called “larger than life” and “Jacqueline du Pré in a farmer’s body” when he enveloped his cello. Peled strives to break down the barriers of the concert hall, about which The Baltimore Sun wrote, “His amiable and inviting personality is exactly the type everyone says we’ll need more of if classical music is to survive.” From 2012 through 2018, Peled performed on the Pablo Casals 1733 Goffriller cello, which was loaned to him personally by Casals’ widow, Marta Casals Istomin. He was also named Music Director for CityMusic Cleveland for the 2019-2020 season.

 

 

CAMILLE SAINT-SAËNS | CELLO CONCERTO NO. 1

Program Notes

In February 1871, as Paris began to recover from the Franco-Prussian war, the new Société Nationale de Musique—of which Saint-Saëns was a founder—promoted its first concert under the banner ‘Ars gallica,’ and the impetus was thereby given to young French composers to outdo the Germans in every way possible. It was partly pressure from the Société that pushed the staid Concerts du Conservatoire into accepting the premiere of Saint-Saëns’s first cello concerto in January 1873, but more the request from the established cellist Auguste Tolbecque, without which, the conductor kindly informed the composer, the work would not have had a hope.

Saint-Saëns broke with convention in writing the concerto. Instead of the normal three-movement concerto form, the score is compact in structure and plays in one continuous movement with three distinct sections. Tunes abound in an orderly way: the main themes of the outer sections move upwards, the second themes downwards. (That is, if the opening cello motif can be called a ‘theme’—the composer’s biographer Brian Rees refers to it as ‘an artefact rather than a melodious outburst.’) The turbulent opening section leads into a delightful minuet, which no doubt reassured Parisian audiences in those troubled times that French culture had survived after all. The return of earlier material in the third movement shows the influence of the cyclic patterns found in the music of Franz Liszt.

This sunny and colorful concerto has always been one of Saint-Saëns’ most popular pieces, and many composers, including Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff, considered it to be the greatest of all cello concertos. Musicologist and conductor Donald Tovey summed up this concerto—chosen by Pablo Casals for his 1905 London debut—with the remark that it is “pure and brilliant without putting on chastity as a garment, and without calling attention to its jewelry at a banquet of poor relations.”

Saint-Saëns’ concerto has appeared seven times on Billings Symphony programs, Soloists have included three MASO Young Artists and world-renown Hungarian-American cellist, János Starker (1924-2013).

 

FRANZ SCHUBERT | “UNFINISHED” SYMPHONY

Program Notes

If anyone can be said to have lived to write music, it was Franz Schubert. While he often complained about the difficulty of composition, he could also write with exceptional speed and fluidity, often finishing one work and immediately beginning another. The compositional output of his far-too-short career is staggering: nearly 1000 works, including 9 symphonies, 6 masses, 21 piano sonatas, 15 string quartets, 7 singspiels, 9 operas, a melodrama, the incidental music for Rosamunde, overtures, chamber music, and more than 600 song settings.

Of all his works, a romantic mystique has long surrounded the story of his “Unfinished” Symphony. Schubert composed his Symphony No. 8 (or No. 7, by some accounts) in B-minor in 1822, fully orchestrating the first two movements and some 20 bars of a scherzo. (A full piano sketch of the scherzo exists, but he never completed the orchestration.) The following year, Schubert received an honorary diploma from the Styrian Music Society in Graz. In his acceptance letter, he mentioned a newly composed symphony, and dispatched the manuscript of the B-minor Symphony to his friend, the composer Anselm Hüttenbrenner, after first ripping out the pages with the incomplete scherzo. For reasons unknown, Hüttenbrenner never forwarded the manuscript to the music society, and it lay in a drawer in his study for the next 42 years. A chance remark disclosed the existence of the symphony to the conductor Johann von Herbeck, who persuaded Hüttenbrenner to let him borrow the score, and in December of 1865—some 37 years after the composer’s death—the B-minor Symphony premiered to great critical acclaim.

The “Unfinished” Symphony is not Schubert’s only unfinished work; indeed, not even his only unfinished symphony, but it is the only one in which the extant movements are fully scored. There has been intense speculation about why Schubert never finished the work: illness (late in 1822 he contracted syphilis, which was eventually to take his life); overwork (at the time he was also working on two operas, the incidental music to the play Rosamunde, and the Wanderer fantasy); a reluctance to invite comparison to Beethoven; a fear that he could not sustain the remarkable character of the first two movements. There may be a grain of truth in this last explanation, for the “Unfinished” was certainly unlike any of his previous symphonies. But the most likely explanation is perhaps the simplest: the 25-year-old composer simply lost interest in the work and moved on.

Schubert’s “Unfinished” Symphony appeared on the Billings Symphony’s premier concert in May 1951, under the baton of founding conductor Robert Staffanson. His successor George Perkins was particularly fond of the work, programming in its, er, entirety for the Alberta Bair stage in November 1956, April 1973 and October 1982, and individual movements for Symphony in the Park in 1958, 1974 and 1976. The BSO’s last performance of the “Unfinished,” was in April 1990, under the baton of Uri Barnea.

 

*Programming subject to change

  • Posted on: June 19, 2021

Billings Symphony: Ensemble Bayona

Music free of limitations and prejudices. Members Eros Jaca, (cello), Vladyslava Luchenko (violin), and Camille Sublet (piano) perform innovative, folk-inspired interpretations of the world’s greatest composers while forming authentic relationships with their audience.

ensemblebayona.com

Please note that masks are required at all times when in our venues.  Thank you for helping us to safely present live music in Billings!

ENSEMBLE BAYONA
Ensemble Bayona, artist in residence at the Auditorio de Zaragoza between 2017 and 2019, explores different ways to interpret the music from the composers of the late 19th century up to the present day. Focusing on innovation and musical quality, the multinational group believes in a musical philosophy free of limitations and prejudices. Ensemble Bayona was awarded the prestigious 2020 Dwight and Ursula Mamlok Prize for Interpreters of Contemporary Music.

 

EROS JACA | CELLO

Eros Jaca, Artistic Director of Ensemble Bayona, has performed as a soloist with many orchestras and in major concert halls of Europe including the Auditorio Nacional de Música (Madrid), St. James Picadilly (London), the Palau de la Música Catalana (Barcelona), and the Tonhalle (Zurich). He works with composers like Heinz Holliger, Helmut Lachenmann and Antón García Abril, and performs in the German Festival Donaueschinger Musiktage or in the Frankfurter Hof Main. He was a guest artist in the famous American ensemble, Bang on a Can All-Stars.

 

 

 

 

 

VLADYSLAVA LUCHENKO | VIOLIN

From an early age, Vladyslava Luchenko developed a deep love for music and keenly desired to make it her life’s dedication. This spontaneously expressed wish was lovingly nurtured by her parents: just five years old, she received her first piano and violin lessons at the local music school. Her rapidly discovered perfect pitch connected with a rare innate musical intuition was developed immediately and attentively. With these unusual predispositions, Vladyslava was admitted at the age of seven to the Lysenko Music School for highly gifted children in Kiev, where she studied until 2006. After winning the first prize in an international competition, she made her solo debut at the age of 11 with the Kiev Philharmonic Orchestra. With this early success; she attracted the attention of the Vladimir Spivakov Institution in Moscow and the corporation, Friends of Ukraine, in Switzerland. This support helped her continue to win numerous prizes from national and international violin and chamber music competitions and led to invitations to perform on concert tours in Switzerland, Spain, Poland, Ukraine, and Russia. A new tutor inspired the impulse which led to new achievements including first prize in the Duttweiler–Hug Wettbewerb (Zurich), second prize in the Concorso Internazionale Violinistico Andrea Postacchini (Fermo, Italy) and second prize in the Concours International de Violon Tibor Varga (Martigny, Switzerland), where she also won the Public Prize and the Special Prize for the best interpretation of a Bártok etude.

Recently Vladyslava performed as a soloist with the Ukrainian Radio Orchestra and State Orchestra, the Verbier Festival Orchestra, and the Luzerner Symphony Orchestra, as well as with the Orchestra Virtuosi Italiani and the Orchestre Royal de Chambre de Wallonie in 2014.

Vladyslava Luchenko performs on Francesco Gobetti violin of 1710, on loan from a private collection.

 

CAMILLE SUBLET | PIANO

Swiss-French pianist Camille Sublet has won several prizes and has performed as a soloist with orchestras including the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Symphony Orchestra Biel Solothurn, Norddeutsche Philharmonie Rostock, Stadtorchester Solothurn. She has studied in Bern, Switzerland, with Tomasz Herbut, and in Brussels with Aleksandar Madzar. Her interest in contemporary music led to her work with Marta Kurtág and Wolfgang Rihm. She is a passionate chamber musician and Lied accompanist.

 

  • Posted on: June 17, 2021

Army of the Dead | Late Night at the Babcock

An Art House Late Night first, we’re presenting a brand new film this May!
From filmmaker Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen, Zack Snyder’s Justice League), Army of the Dead takes place following a zombie outbreak that has left Las Vegas in ruins and walled off from the rest of the world. When Scott Ward (Dave Bautista), a former zombie war hero who’s now flipping burgers on the outskirts of the town he now calls home, is approached by casino boss Bly Tanaka (Hiroyuki Sanada), it’s with the ultimate proposition: break into the zombie-infested quarantine zone to retrieve $200 million sitting in a vault beneath the strip before the city is nuked by the government in 32 hours. With little left to lose, Ward takes on the challenge, assembling a ragtag team of experts for the heist. With a ticking clock, a notoriously impenetrable vault, and a smarter, faster horde of Alpha zombies closing in, only one thing’s for certain in the greatest heist ever attempted: survivors take all.
  • Posted on: May 22, 2021

Army of the Dead | Late Night at the Babcock

An Art House Late Night first, we’re presenting a brand new film this May!
From filmmaker Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen, Zack Snyder’s Justice League), Army of the Dead takes place following a zombie outbreak that has left Las Vegas in ruins and walled off from the rest of the world. When Scott Ward (Dave Bautista), a former zombie war hero who’s now flipping burgers on the outskirts of the town he now calls home, is approached by casino boss Bly Tanaka (Hiroyuki Sanada), it’s with the ultimate proposition: break into the zombie-infested quarantine zone to retrieve $200 million sitting in a vault beneath the strip before the city is nuked by the government in 32 hours. With little left to lose, Ward takes on the challenge, assembling a ragtag team of experts for the heist. With a ticking clock, a notoriously impenetrable vault, and a smarter, faster horde of Alpha zombies closing in, only one thing’s for certain in the greatest heist ever attempted: survivors take all.
  • Posted on: May 21, 2021

Billings Symphony: Duke Ellington’s Far East Suite

Experience Duke Ellington’s 1968 Grammy Award-winning Far East Suite as performed by the Rocky Mountain Jazz Collective.

rockymountainjazzcollective.com

Please note that masks are required at all times when in our venues.  Thank you for helping us to safely present live music in Billings!

The Rocky Mountain Jazz Collective was created in 2019 by highly respected members of the jazz community in Montana.  Through education outreach in the community and regular performance in an environment that is best suited for listening, the mission of the RMJC is to create greater awareness and appreciation for jazz music and history in the Rocky Mountain region.

RMJC aims to increase appreciation and awareness of jazz music through the performance of themed programs consisting of material with cultural and historical significance to the history and development of jazz.

SCOTT JEPPESEN | SAXOPHONE

Scott Jeppesen is an Assistant Professor of Music at MSU Billings teaching music theory, ear training, music history, jazz combo, and private lessons on saxophone, clarinet, and flute.

Scott is an alumnus of the University of Southern California where he earned Bachelor of Music, Master of Music, and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees in Jazz Studies.

Prior to accepting the position at MSU Billings, Scott lived in Los Angeles for seventeen years. In that time, he performed with Maria Schneider, Bobby McFerrin, Burt Bacharach, Lalo Schifrin, Alan Pasqua, Bill Watrous, Shelly Berg, Manhattan Transfer, Stevie Wonder, Nancy Wilson, Artie Shaw, Bob Mintzer, Dave Brubeck, Natalie Cole, Louis Bellson, Al Jarreau, Steve Miller, Randy Brecker, and James Moody … just to name a few. Scott has composed and arranged for many different artists including Steve Miller, Ramsey Lewis, Natalie Cole, Ruben Studdard, Dave Koz, Ledisi, Burt Bacharach, Monica Mancini, Scott Martin, and the PBS special, We Love Ella! A Tribute to Ella (Fitzgerald), which aired in the spring of 2007.

In 2009, he co-founded Cultivating Creative Minds along with his wife, Roxanne, to provide art instruction to elementary school-aged students throughout Santa Clarita, CA.

Scott has also performed clinics for many colleges, high schools, and middle schools around northern and southern California including the University of Southern California, Cal State University Sacramento, Brubeck Institute at the University of the Pacific, Cal State University Northridge, Cal State University Sonoma, American River College, West Ranch High School, Canyon High School, and Saugus High School. In addition to clinics, Scott is in demand as a featured guest artist. In 2014, Scott was the featured artist with California State University Sacramento jazz ensembles where they performed the music of the Joe Henderson Big Band. In the same year, Scott was the guest artist for the SuperJazz at the Ranch festival in Stevenson Ranch, CA, where he performed a duo set with Russell Ferrante of the legendary Yellowjackets.

JOHN ROBERTS | TROMBONE

John began playing the piano at the age of 5 while living on an isolated ranch in Southeastern, Montana. At age 11, he picked up the trombone to play in the grade school band. After graduating in 1996 from MSU Billings with a BA in Music Performance, John moved to Los Angeles to earn his Master of Fine Arts in Western Orchestral Trombone Performance from California Institute of the Arts.

Feeling equally comfortable in orchestral and commercial music realms, John has toured, recorded, and performed in Los Angeles, around the U.S., and around the world, including Mexico, India, Asia, Europe, the Caribbean, Australia, and Africa. Tours include Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca (Congolese/Cuban), Bobby Womack (Soul), Los Pinguos (Argentine), The Temptations, The New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, and others. Other performances and recordings include multiple American and Latin Grammy concerts, Fallout Boy, Chris Botti, Feist, Sting, Dr. Dre, Jill Scott, Mariah Carey, Lady Gaga, Frank Sinatra Jr., Chaka Khan, Burt Bacharach, The Ojays, Cher, Beverly Crawford, Christina Aguilera, NPR, PBS, Disney, and others.

After 17 years based in Los Angeles, John is now on staff at MSU Billings teaching Jazz, music theory, low brass, and world music. He regularly works and performs as a clinician and guest artist in schools, continuing to hone his skills as an educator by sharing the ‘real world’ of music with his students.

John is active in Montana and Los Angeles performing and studio scenes as an arranger, bandleader, session player, and composer. Recent projects include Ricardo Lemvo’s new Cuban-West African album, Straight Outta Compton, and John’s own world-fusion record, Soul y Pimienta, which blends Cuban, African and American soul and jazz elements.

When not dabbling in the world of music, John is likely found (or not found!) gallivanting about the mountains or prairie via foot, 4WD, skis or mountain bike.

  • Posted on: May 15, 2021